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HBV Epidemiology & Mortality

Viral Hepatitis Is Now A Major Global Cause of Death, Exceeding HIV and TB

Hepatitis B and C have become leading causes of death and disability worldwide, as other major communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis (TB) have come under better control, according to an analysis published in the July 8 online edition of The Lancet.

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Survey Shows More than 800,000 in U.S. Have Hepatitis B, Half of Them Asian

Although nearly 70 million people in the U.S. have been vaccinated against hepatitis B virus (HBV), there are still 847,000 people with evidence of infection, about 400,000 of whom are Asian, according to the latest NHANES survey results published in the February edition of Hepatology.

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AASLD 2014: Hepatitis B Testing and Treatment Rates Are Low Among U.S. Veterans

Only 15% of U.S. veterans have been tested for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and among those who tested HBsAg positive just one-quarter received antiviral treatment and 13% were screened for liver cancer -- although both measures were shown to reduce the risk of death -- researchers reported Sunday at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting in Boston.

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Latino Adults Have Hepatitis B Rates Similar to the General U.S. Population

Hispanic and Latino adults living in the U.S. are about as likely as the general population to have active hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, though rates varied across subgroups based on country of origin, according to research published in the February edition of Hepatology.

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Hepatitis B and C Reduce Survival by More than 20 Years

People with chronic hepatitis B or C lived about 2 decades less on average than those who did not have these infections, and chronic viral hepatitis was the 15th leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2010, CDC researchers reported in the January 1, 2014, issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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