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Allergy Drug Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Replication in Mouse Study

The over-the-counter allergy medication chlorcyclizine HCl, or CCZ, was found to be a potent inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b and 2a replication, according to a laboratory study described in the April 8 edition of Science Translational Medicine. The study authors suggest that this older drug could potentially be an affordable component of combination treatment. A Phase 1 clinical trial is now underway.

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Janssen Interferon-Free Regimen with Simeprevir Cures Most Patients with Genotype 1 HCV

A 12-week all-oral regimen containing the FDA-approved HCV protease inhibitor simeprevir (Olysio) plus 2 investigational direct-acting antivirals drugs being developed by Janssen cured up to 95% of people with genotype 1 hepatitis C, according to study findings presented at the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL) conference last month in Istanbul.

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Coverage of the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections (CROI 2015), February 23-26, 2015, in Seattle.

Conference highlights include PrEP and HIV treatment as prevention, hepatitis C treatment for HIV/HCV coinfected people, new antiretroviral drugs, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions, TB, Ebola virus, and access to care.

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage by topic

CROI website

3/2/15

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FDA Will Consider Approval of Daclatasvir for Genotype 3 Hepatitis C Treatment

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted Bristol-Myers Squibb's application for approval of stand-alone daclatasvir (Daklinza) for the treatment of genotype 3 hepatitis C virus (HCV), to be used in combination with sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), the company announced last week.

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CROI 2015: Retrovirus Conference Now Underway in Seattle

The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) takes place this week, February 23-26, at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. CROI focuses on HIV treatment, prevention, and basic science. For the past several years it has also included substantial hepatitis C content, and this year will feature presentations on Ebola virus. HIVandHepatitis.com is on site in Seattle all week bringing you news coverage and Twitter updates (@HIVandHepatitis).

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