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CROI 2014: Tenofovir Alone May Work as Well as Truvada for Pre-exposure Prophylaxis

Tenofovir used as a single agent for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) may be as effective as the Truvada (tenofovir/emtricitabine) coformulation for preventing HIV infection, which, if confirmed, could have implications for cost and access worldwide.

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Curbing HIV Among Drug Users Reduces AIDS and Death Among Heterosexuals

Counseling, testing, and harm reduction programs that reduce HIV transmission among people who inject drugs (PWID) as well as non-injecting drug users were associated with an overall reduction in rates of progression to AIDS and mortality among heterosexuals in U.S. cities, according to study described in the April edition of Annals of Epidemiology.

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CROI 2014: Self-Reports Did Not Reflect Actual Gel or Pill Use in VOICE PrEP Trial

Self-reported adherence to daily tenofovir or Truvada pills or tenofovir vaginal gel for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV infection did not match drug levels in the body, helping to explain the lack of protection seen in the VOICE trial, researchers reported at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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Studies Shed Light on Immune Responses in HIV Vaccine Trials

A specific type of antibody known as IgG3, targeting the V1V2 portion of the HIV envelope, appears to be responsible for the temporary protection against HIV infection seen in one of the only partially successful HIV vaccine trials to date, according to 2 reports in the March 19 edition of Science Translational Medicine.

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CROI 2014: Women with Circumcised Partners Less Likely to Have HIV

A study from Orange Farm near Johannesburg in South Africa -- the area that hosted the first-ever randomized controlled trial of male circumcision for HIV prevention, which concluded in 2005 -- has found evidence that women who are partners of circumcised men are less likely to have HIV themselves, according to a presentation at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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