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CROI 2015: Antiretrovirals in the Pipeline: New Tenofovir and HIV Maturation Inhibitor [VIDEO]

Tenofovir alafenamide, a new formulation that works as well as the current formulation but is easier on the kidneys and bones, and BMS-955176, a maturation inhibitor that prevents HIV from producing complete new infectious virus, were among the novel antiretroviral drugs discussed at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections(CROI) last week in Seattle.

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CROI 2015: HIV Attachment Inhibitor BMS-663068 Shown Safe and Effective in Phase 2b Study

Bristol-Myers Squibb's BMS-663068 or fostemsavir, a first-in-class HIV attachment inhibitor that stops the virus from binding to and entering cells, was well-tolerated and demonstrated good antiviral activity in a study presented at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week in Seattle. Related research showed that BMS-663068 can safely be taken with antiretrovirals commonly used by treatment-experienced patients. A Phase 3 trial is now underway.

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CROI 2015: Tenofovir Alafenamide as Effective but Safer for Kidneys and Bones than TDF

Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), a new formulation that has lower concentrations in the blood but reaches higher levels in cells, is as effective as the older version, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), according to a report at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) this week in Seattle. A second study showed that TAF has less detrimental effects on the kidneys and bones compared with TDF. TAF has been submitted for approval in the U.S. and Europe.

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CROI 2015: Treatment Cascades and Viral Load Surveys Inform ART as Prevention in Africa

Reaching ambitious HIV prevention targets in South Africa will require intensified efforts to engage and retain men and young people in care, in order to increase the proportion of people on HIV treatment with suppressed viral load, according to a national study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2015) last week in Seattle. Another study, conducted in 3 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, showed that to maximize the preventive effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART), efforts to expand treatment coverage need to focus on those with the highest viral load off treatment -- mainly people who are already eligible for treatment under current guidelines.

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CROI 2015: Putting On Too Much Weight After Starting ART Increases Chronic Inflammation

A return to normal weight after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) can be beneficial for very sick, underweight individuals living with HIV -- but further weight gain appears to increase markers of inflammation associated with metabolic complications and poorer survival, according to a study reported at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) this week in Seattle.

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Coverage of the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections (CROI 2015), February 23-26, 2015, in Seattle.

Conference highlights include PrEP and HIV treatment as prevention, hepatitis C treatment for HIV/HCV coinfected people, new antiretroviral drugs, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions, TB, Ebola virus, and access to care.

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage by topic

CROI website

3/2/15

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CROI 2015: The Quest for a Cure for HIV [VIDEO]

Research towards a cure for HIV continues, despite some recent setbacks. Several investigators presented their work in a session on HIV persistence, latency reversal, and viremia rebound at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections(CROI) this week in Seattle. There is still enthusiasm in the HIV cure field, said John Mellors of the University of Pittsburgh, but progress will be slow.

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