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HIV/HCV Coinfection

HCV Does Not Worsen Cognitive Impairment in HIV Positive People without Advanced Liver Damage

Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) does not appear to contribute to neurocognitive impairment in people with HIV who do not have advanced liver disease, according to results from the CHARTER study published in the December 10 online edition of Neurology.

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Coverage of the 2014 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2014) in Boston, November 7-11, 2014.

Conference highlights include new interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C -- including options for people with cirrhosis, and liver transplant recipients -- treatment for hepatitis B, and prevention and management of advanced liver disease.

Full listing by topic

The Liver Meeting website

12/2/14

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Community Leaders, HIV Doctors Oppose Hepatitis C Treatment Barriers

A coalition of hepatitis C advocacy organizations and medical providers has issued an open letter to the Secretary of Health and Human Services calling for an end to restrictions on access to hepatitis C treatment by private insurers and public payers seeking to avoid the cost of newly approved direct-acting antivirals. HIV medical providers also called for reducing barriers to treatment, including restrictions on which medical specialists may treat people with hepatitis C.

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AASLD 2014: Sofosbuvir + Simeprevir Shows Good Results in Real-World Use

Regimens containing sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) -- including sofosbuvir plus simeprevir (Olysio) -- work well for people with hepatitis C genotype 1 in real-world use, which to date has included some of the patients most urgently in need of treatment at the dawn of the interferon-free era, according to a pair of presentations at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting last week in Boston. Sofosbuvir plus ribavirin alone is highly effective for people with genotype 2.

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Coverage of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2014), September 5-9, in Washington, DC.

Conference highlights include experimental antiretroviral therapies for HIV, interferon-free treatment for hepatitis C, and news about other infectious diseases including tuberculosis, HPV, influenza, and Ebola virus.

Full listing of coverage by topic

ICAAC 2014 website

9/8/14

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AASLD 2014: AbbVie 3D Regimen and Sofosbuvir/ Ribavirin Show High Cure Rates for HIV/HCV Coinfection

AbbVie's 3D regimen (paritaprevir/ombitasvir/ritonavir plus dasabuvir) with ribavirin for 12 weeks and Gilead Science's sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus ribavirin for 24 weeks both produced good sustained virological response rates for most patients with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection, according to studies presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting last week in Boston.

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ICAAC 2014: AbbVie 3D Combination Works Well for People with HIV/HCV Coinfection

An all-oral regimen of 3 direct-acting antivirals plus ribavirin taken for 12 weeks led to sustained virological response in 94% of HIV positive people with mostly genotype 1a hepatitis C coinfection in the TURQUOISE-I study, according to data presented at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy this week in Washington, DC.

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AASLD 2014: HIV Positive People Have High Survival Rates After Liver Transplants Due to HCC

People with HIV -- most of whom were coinfected with hepatitis B or C -- generally had good outcomes after liver transplantation due to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), with 5-year survival rates similar to those of HIV negative transplant recipients and better than those of people who underwent other types of liver cancer treatment, researchers reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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Coverage of the 2014 International AIDS Conference

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), July 20-25, in Melbourne, Australia.

Conference highlights include biomedical HIV prevention (PrEP and treatment-as-prevention), HIV cure research, interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C and HIV/HCV coinfection, access to treatment, and fighting stigma and criminalization of key affected populations.

Full listing by topic

AIDS 2014 website

7/25/14

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AASLD 2014: Sustained Response to HCV Treatment Reduces Mortality, Liver Cancer, Liver Transplants

People who achieve sustained virological response (SVR) when treated with interferon-based therapy for hepatitis C have a lower risk of death, are less likely to develop liver cancer, and need fewer liver transplants than those who were treated but not cured, according to results from a meta-analysis of more than 34,000 patients presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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AIDS 2014: HIV/HCV Coinfected Have High Cure Rates with Interferon-free Hep C Combos

Two studies presented at the 20thInternational AIDS Conference this week in Melbourne showed that all-oral regimens of direct-acting antiviral agents for hepatitis C are safe and effective for HIV positive people. Both regimens demonstrated sustained virological response rates similar to those seen in people with HCV alone.

-- Sofosbuvir + Ribavirin Cures More Than 80% of HIV/HCV Coinfected People

-- AbbVie 3D Regimen Cures Most Genotype 1 HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

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AASLD 2014: Sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir Cures Nearly All Genotype 1 HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

All but 1 participant treated with a coformulation of sofosbuvir and ledipasvir (Harvoni) achieved sustained virological response at 12 weeks post-treatment in a study looking at traditionally hard-to-treat HIV/HCV coinfected patients, researchers reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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AIDS 2014: AbbVie 3D Regimen Cures Most Genotype 1 HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

An all-oral regimen of 3 direct-acting antivirals plus ribavirin taken for 12 weeks demonstrated a sustained virological response rate of 94% for people coinfected with HIV and genotype 1 hepatitis C in the TURQUOISE-I study, according to a late-breaking report at the 20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014) this week in Melbourne, Australia.

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IDWeek 2014: Study Shows HIV/HCV Coinfected Women Have Lower Bone Density

ART-treated women with HIV/HCV coinfection have greater deficits in some structural bone parameters compared to women with HIV only, HCV only, or neither virus, according to the results of a cross-sectional study presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia. Among women with HCV, bone loss was most profound in those with stage 3-4 liver fibrosis or cirrhosis, which adversely effects bone health.

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AIDS 2014: Sofosbuvir + Ribavirin Cures More Than 80% of HIV/HCV Coinfected People

An interferon-free regimen of sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus ribavirin for 24 weeks led to sustained virological response in 84% to 89% of HIV positive chronic hepatitis C patients with HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3, or 4, according to results from the PHOTON-2 study presented at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia. Cure rates were lower, however, for genotype 1a patients with liver cirrhosis.

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IDWeek 2014: HIV/HCV Coinfected People Do Not Have Poorer CD4 Cell Recovery

Among HIV positive people on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection was not associated with significantly lower CD4 T-cell or B-cell gains, according to study findings presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia.alt

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Studies Look at Hepatitis C Care Cascade and Healthcare Utilization

Half of people with hepatitis C in the U.S. are aware of their infection, but fewer than 10% have been successfully treated and achieved sustained virological response (SVR), according to a meta-analysis published July 2 in the open-access journal PLoS ONE. Despite these gaps in testing, care, and treatment, hepatitis C accounts for a substantial share of healthcare utilization, especially among baby boomers, a related study found.

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Coverage of IDWeek 2014

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of IDWeek 2014, October 8-12, in Philadelphia.

Conference highlights include the HIV cascade of care, experimental antiretroviral therapies, interferon-free hepatitis C treatment, and news about other infectious diseases including Ebola virus and enterovirus D68.

Full listing of coverage by topic

IDWeek 2014 website

10/17/14

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ASCO: HCV Reactivation, Brain Involvement Do Not Worsen Lymphoma Survival for People with HIV

Reactivation of hepatitis C was common among HIV positive people with lymphoma, but did not appear to lead to worse outcomes or decreased survival, according to a study presented at the 50th American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting this week in Chicago. A related study found that having central nervous system involvement at the time of diagnosis did not decrease survival of people with AIDS-related lymphoma.

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HCV Sexual Transmission: HIV Negative May Be at Risk, More Awareness and Testing Needed

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to be sexually transmitted among HIV positive men who have sex with men, but HIV negative men may be at risk as well, according to recent reports. Other recent studies have looked at awareness of HCV sexual transmission and screening practices, suggesting that improvement is needed in both areas.

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Hepatitis C Cascade Studies Show Gaps in Testing and Treatment

About half of people with hepatitis C are aware of their infection but less than 10% have been successfully treated and achieved sustained virological response, according to a meta-analysis presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014). A related study found that among HIV/HCV coinfected people, 40% had been referred to hepatitis C care but only 4% were cured.

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