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Coinfection

AIDS 2016: AbbVie 3D and 2D Hepatitis C Combos Work Well for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

AbbVie's paritaprevir-based 3D regimen for hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 and 2D regimen for genotype 4 were shown to be highly effective and well-tolerated for HIV-positive people with HCV coinfection in the TURQUOISE-I trial, according to a report at the 21st International AIDS Conference last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Sofosbuvir/ Velpatasvir Shows High Cure Rate in HIV/HCV Coinfection Study

The once-daily coformulation of sofosbuvir and velpatasvir was highly effective against all hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and was safe and well tolerated by HIV/HCV coinfected patients in the ASTRAL-5 trial, according to results presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016)this week in Durban. A related analysis showed that sofosbuvir/velpatasvir can be safely combined with most widely used antiretrovirals, with the exception of efavirenz.

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CROI 2016: HIV/HBV Coinfection Linked to Worse Immune Recovery and Death

HIV-positive people with hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection had impaired CD4 cell recovery after starting antiretroviral (ART) and a higher risk of death than those without hepatitis B, but use of ART regimens containing tenofovir significantly reduced mortality, according to a study presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016)in Boston.

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Incidence of Liver Cancer Is Increasing Among People with HIV/HCV Coinfection

Incidence of liver cancer is increasing among people with HIV co-infection, an international team of investigators report in the June 15 online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. Researchers from Europe and Canada pooled data gathered between 2001 and 2014 from 6 prospective cohorts and found that incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) increased, but the incidence of serious liver related events -- decompensated liver disease or liver-related death -- declined.

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More Than 2 Million People Worldwide Are Coinfected with HIV and Hepatitis C

Approximately 2.3 million people are living with both HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV), about half of whom are people who inject drugs, according to a meta-analysis of nearly 800 studies published in the February 24 advance online edition of The Lancet. The analysis found that the overall likelihood of people with HIV being coinfected with HCV is about 6%, but good data are lacking for many countries.

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EASL 2016: Does Having HIV Affect Response to Hepatitis C Treatment?

A study from the U.S. Veterans Health Administration found that HIV-positive people responded as well as those without HIV to direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy for hepatitis C, while a Spanish study showed that HIV/HCV coinfected people were less likely to be cured. These conflicting findings, presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's International Liver Congress (EASL 2016) last month in Barcelona, indicate that the interactions between HIV and hepatitis C are still not fully understood.alt

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CROI 2016: Sofosbuvir/ Velpatasvir for Hepatitis C Can Be Administered with Most Antiretrovirals

Sofosbuvir/velpatasvir, a forthcoming combination that effectively treats all hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes, can be safely used with most boosted antiretrovirals for HIV/HCV coinfected people, according to a study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016)last week in Boston.

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EASL 2016: Sofosbuvir/ Velpatasvir Cures 95% of HIV/HCV Coinfected People

A dual regimen of sofosbuvir plus velpatasvir was well-tolerated and highly effective against hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 1 through 4 in HIV-positive people with chronic hepatitis C coinfection, according to results from the Phase 3 ASTRAL-5 trial presented at the 2016 EASL International Liver Congress last week in Barcelona.

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EACS 2015: Successful Hepatitis C Treatment Lowers Risk of Death for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

Hepatitis C treatment that leads to sustained virological response (SVR) -- generally regarded as a cure -- was associated with a reduced risk of liver-related death and improved overall survival in an analysis of 3500 HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected patients, according to a presentation at the 15th European AIDS Conference last week in Barcelona. A related study found that while some liver-related events are declining over time, liver cancer remains a risk for coinfected people.

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