Coinfection

Injection Drug Use and Hepatitis C Coinfection Increase Risk of Death for People with HIV

HIV-positive people who inject drugs and those who are coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) have elevated mortality rates, according to a report from the ART Cohort Collaboration published in the July 1 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. HIV/HCV coinfected drug injectors had a high risk of liver-related death, but those without HCV still had higher mortality due to various causes compared with non-injectors.

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Do Sex and HIV/HCV Coinfection Affect Response to Antiretroviral Treatment?

HIV-positive men and women coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) showed impaired CD4 T-cell restoration after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) and had a 40% greater risk of death than people with HIV alone, though they were equally likely to achieve HIV viral suppression, according to study findings published in the May 18 advance edition of AIDS Patient Care and STDs.

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CROI 2015: Sustained Virological Response Represents a Long-term Cure for Hepatitis C

Almost all patients with hepatitis C virus alone or HIV/HCV coinfection who achieved sustained virological response (SVR) to treatment with sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus ribavirin or sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni) still had undetectable HCV RNA up to 2.4 years later, confirming that SVR represents a cure, according to a poster presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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CROI 2015: HCV Sexual Transmission Linked to Anal Sex, Drug Use, Lower CD4 Count

In addition to the usual risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) sexual transmission seen in most previous studies -- such as anal sex and having other sexually transmitted infections -- researchers in the Netherlands also saw an association with nasal and injection drug use and lower CD4 T-cell count, they reported in a poster presentation at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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CROI 2015: Sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir May Alter Antiretroviral Levels in HIV/HCV Coinfected People

HIV/HCV coinfected people who take sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni) to treat hepatitis C along with boosted protease inhibitor antiretroviral regimens may experience changes in drugs levels, but these are mostly not considered clinically relevant, according to a drug-drug interaction study presented at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last month in Seattle. However, data on the safety and efficacy of combining sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and boosted protease inhibitors during treatment are lacking, and increased tenofovir exposure may be a concern.

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CROI 2015: End-Stage Liver Disease Among HIV+ People with Hepatitis B or C

People coinfected with HIV and hepatitis B or C virus are more likely to progress to end-stage liver disease, or liver failure, compared to those with HIV alone, and individuals triply infected with all 3 viruses are at greatest risk, according to study findings presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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CROI 2015: Hepatitis C -- Mission Accomplished? [VIDEO]

New interferon-free treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has brought about a revolution in treatment, but challenges still remain -- among them too few people with HCV being diagnosed and the high cost of the new drugs -- before the mission can be declared a success. A panel of hepatitis C experts discuss research presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections(CROI) in Seattle with HIVandHepatitis.com editor Liz Highleyman in this IFARA video.

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CROI 2015: Re-infection Due to Ongoing Risk Is Probably the Cause of HCV Recurrence After SVR

Rates of hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence after successful therapy differ markedly between risk groups, according to the results of a meta-analysis presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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CROI 2015: Deferring Hepatitis C Treatment Can Lead to Liver Cancer and Death

HIV/HCV coinfected people who delay hepatitis C treatment remain at risk for liver failure, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver-related death even after being cured -- with outcomes worsening the longer it is put off -- indicating that treatment should not be deferred until advanced disease, according to a presentation at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week in Seattle. Treating only after progression to cirrhosis increased the risk of liver-related death by more than 5-fold and the duration of infectiousness by 4-fold.

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