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HIV Policy & Advocacy

AIDS 2016: HIV Stigma Persists in the Undetectable Era

In an era of widespread HIV treatment and undetectable viral load, stigma remains a persistent feature in the lives of almost half of people living with diagnosed HIV in the U.K., according to findings from The People Living with HIV Stigma Survey UK 2015, reported at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban. Nonetheless the majority of people with HIV score highly on measures of psychological resilience, enabling them to cope better with stigma.

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AIDS 2016: Progress Towards 90-90-90 Targets is Promising, But Funding Is the Critical Step

The United Nations 90-90-90 targets for HIV testing, treatment, and viral suppression are achievable by 2020 in many high-burden countries, but donor retreat is now the biggest threat to widespread success, delegates agreed at the UN 90-90-90 Target Workshop ahead of the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) in Durban.

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UN Commits to More HIV Treatment, but Key Populations Are Excluded

United Nations member states last week agreed to new targets for getting more people with HIV on treatment by 2020 and ending the AIDS epidemic as a public health threat by 2030 at the UN General Assembly High-Level Meeting on Ending AIDS. But a coalition of conservative countries was able to exclude civil society groups representing gay and transgender people and people who use drugs -- key affected populates that advocates say must be part of the conversation.

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AIDS 2016: Second Durban Declaration Highlights Key Advances and Barriers

In advance of the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016), starting July 18 in Durban, South Africa, the International AIDS Society has released the Second Durban Declaration, highlighting the 5 key scientific advances in the HIV field and 5 key structural barriers that have yet to be overcome.

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17 Million People Worldwide Are Now Receiving HIV Treatment

The number of people with HIV receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) worldwide has reached 17 million, although about the same number still do not have access to treatment and the decline in new infections has slowed, indicating the need to "reinvigorate" prevention efforts, according to the latest update from UNAIDS.

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