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Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

Study Suggests Truvada PrEP Should Start 1 Week Before and Continue 4 Weeks After Sex

An intensive pharmacokinetic study of tenofovir/emtricitabine (Truvada) for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) showed that blood and rectal drugs levels corresponding to high PrEP activity for men who have sex with men (MSM) are reached after about 1 week of daily dosing and appear to remain adequate for several days after the last pill, according to a report in the March 1 edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. It is not known, however, whether this dosing schedule would work as well for women or other groups.

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CROI 2015: Daily PrEP Leads to Better Adherence and Protective Drug Levels in Women

HIV-negative African women assigned to take once-daily Truvada for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) achieved better adherence than those assigned to take PrEP twice-weekly or before and after sex, according to findings from the HPTN 067 trial presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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Some Providers Remain Reluctant to Prescribe HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis

Despite a growing body of evidence showing that Truvada (tenofovir/emtricitabine) pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is highly effective for HIV prevention, less than half of surveyed healthcare providers are likely to prescribe it for at-risk heterosexuals or people who inject drugs -- though the likelihood approaches 80% for gay men with HIV-positive partners -- according to a study published in the April edition of HIV Specialist, the magazine of the American Academy of HIV Medicine (AAHIVM).

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Women in PrEP Trial Feared Having to Leave Study if They Reported Low Adherence

Post-study interviews and computer questionnaires conducted with former participants in the Fem-PrEP trial of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) that reported zero effectiveness show that the women concealed their low adherence because -- despite reassurances from researchers -- they feared they would be asked to leave the study, according to a report in the April 2015 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

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CROI 2015: Combining PrEP and ART Could Nearly Eliminate HIV Infection

Giving both pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and antiretroviral therapy (ART) to heterosexual couples where one partner has HIV (serodiscordant couples) can almost eliminate the chance of infection of the HIV negative partner, a study presented at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week in Seattle has shown.

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