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Experimental HIV Drugs

HIV Glasgow: Long-Acting HIV Fusion Inhibitor Albuvirtide Regimen Matches Standard Therapy

A new fusion inhibitor, albuvirtide, under development in China, combined with a boosted protease inhibitor, proved just as effective as a triple regimen of lopinavir/ritonavir plus 2 NRTIs for treatment-experienced HIV patients, according to a report at the International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection last month in Glasgow.

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IDWeek 2016: Ibalizumab Monoclonal Antibody Looks Promising for HIV Patients Left Behind

Ibalizumab, an experimental antiretroviral agent that works differently than existing HIV drugs, demonstrated promising safety and antiviral activity in a small Phase 3 study of people with highly drug-resistant virus, according to a report at the IDWeek conference this week in New Orleans. If confirmed in larger studies, this could be good news for HIV patients who cannot be successfully treated using available therapies.

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ASM Microbe 2016: PRO-140 Antibody Injections Maintain Viral Suppression Off ART

Subcutaneous injections of PRO 140, a monoclonal antibody that blocks HIV entry into cells, was well-tolerated and maintained undetectable viral load for more than a year after stopping antiretroviral therapy (ART) in patients with viral suppression, according to a study presented at the ASM Microbe 2016 meeting this week in Boston.

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AIDS 2016: Long-Acting Injectable Drugs Work Well for HIV Maintenance Therapy

A pair of long-acting injectable antiretrovirals -- cabotegravir and rilpivirine -- administered once every 4 or 8 weeks maintained viral suppression in people who switched regimens with undetectable viral load, according to 48-week results from the LATTE-2 trial presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) this week in Durban. A related qualitative analysis showed that study participants preferred long-acting injectables over pills for several reasons.

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FDA Approves Descovy TAF Combination Pill for HIV Treatment, Not Yet for PrEP

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this week approved Gilead Sciences' Descovy, a new combination pill containing tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), which is easier on the kidneys and bones than the older tenfovir disiproxil fumarate (TDF) version. The new coformulation is similar to Truvada, but it has been approved only for use as a component of HIV treatment, not for pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP.

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