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Experimental HIV Drugs

CROI 2015: Cabotegravir and Rilpivirine Effective for HIV Maintenance Therapy at 96 Weeks

A combination of 2 once-daily oral antiretrovirals -- the next-generation integrase inhibitor cabotegravir (GSK1265744) and the approved NNRTI rilpivirine -- was as effective as an efavirenz-based regimen when used as maintenance therapy to keep viral load suppressed, according to a poster presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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CROI 2015: Antiretrovirals in the Pipeline: New Tenofovir and HIV Maturation Inhibitor [VIDEO]

Tenofovir alafenamide, a new formulation that works as well as the current formulation but is easier on the kidneys and bones, and BMS-955176, a maturation inhibitor that prevents HIV from producing complete new infectious virus, were among the novel antiretroviral drugs discussed at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections(CROI) last week in Seattle.

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CROI 2015: Tenofovir Alafenamide as Effective but Safer for Kidneys and Bones than TDF

Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), a new formulation that has lower concentrations in the blood but reaches higher levels in cells, is as effective as the older version, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), according to a report at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) this week in Seattle. A second study showed that TAF has less detrimental effects on the kidneys and bones compared with TDF. TAF has been submitted for approval in the U.S. and Europe.

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CROI 2015: HIV Attachment Inhibitor BMS-663068 Shown Safe and Effective in Phase 2b Study

Bristol-Myers Squibb's BMS-663068 or fostemsavir, a first-in-class HIV attachment inhibitor that stops the virus from binding to and entering cells, was well-tolerated and demonstrated good antiviral activity in a study presented at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week in Seattle. Related research showed that BMS-663068 can safely be taken with antiretrovirals commonly used by treatment-experienced patients. A Phase 3 trial is now underway.

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CROI 2015: Putting On Too Much Weight After Starting ART Increases Chronic Inflammation

A return to normal weight after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) can be beneficial for very sick, underweight individuals living with HIV -- but further weight gain appears to increase markers of inflammation associated with metabolic complications and poorer survival, according to a study reported at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) this week in Seattle.

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